A Canadian Family

Natives, French Canadians, Acadians

A Gaspesian Dog Cart at St. Anne des Monts, P.Q. (1)

Number 1 of a ten-part series of postcards about the Working Dogs of the Gaspe Peninsula, Quebec.

Property - A Canadian Family Vintage Postcard Collection

Related Posts:

Index: Vintage Postcards of Quebec 

Series: Gaspesian Dog Carts (2/4)  | Habitant Dog Cart on Gaspe Coast, P.Q.

Series: Gaspesian Dog Carts (3/4)  |   Roadside Group on Gaspe Highway, P.Q.

Series: Gaspesian Dog Carts (4/4)  | Racing Sulky, Quebec

February 20, 2009 - Posted by | .

6 Comments »

  1. A ten part series! I am officially hooked! I adore your blog!

    Like

    Comment by Marie Isabelle | February 21, 2009 | Reply

  2. How interesting – a 10 part series on working dogs! I’ve only heard of sheep dogs and I suppose huskies too up to now, so I will be watching for more.

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    Comment by Sheila | February 21, 2009 | Reply

  3. Thanks, Sheila!
    I actually came across this topic by accident while I was searching for Gaspe postcards. I found out that dogs were used in this manner in the Gaspesie and as far as I know this wasn’t so in other regions of Quebec.
    This seems to have been a big tradition in parts of Europe – especially Belgium (for milk carts) and parts of rural France. So far I haven’t determined whether the tradition arose independently in Quebec or whether it was brought here by Normans from France.

    Like

    Comment by evelynyvonnetheriault | February 21, 2009 | Reply

  4. There is a small collection of dog carriages at the castle in our town! There is even one that looks like a cradle and was obviously used as a dog powered stroller of sorts.

    Like

    Comment by Marie Isabelle | February 22, 2009 | Reply

    • I did not know they were used in different parts of France. Where exactly is your town in France? And do you have any dog postcards in your collection?

      Like

      Comment by evelynyvonnetheriault | February 22, 2009 | Reply

  5. You are doing a wonderful job at preserving history and educating the public. Thank you.

    Like

    Comment by Robert Anderson | May 24, 2010 | Reply


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