A Canadian Family

First Nations, French Canadians & Acadians

The Battle of Riviere-Ouelle (1690)

In a former post (Riviere-Ouelle: Une Paroisse Canadienne au XVII Siecle), I introduced Abbe. Casgrain’s book and shared some of his genealogical tables of the founding families of Riviere-Ouelle. Today I’d like to recount some of what Abbe Casgrain had to say about one of Riviere Ouelle’s most historic moments.

 

habitants11

 

The year was 1690. The British were attacking Nouvelle France (today’s Quebec) and word had reached all the French settlements that a flotilla of thirty British ships was coming down the St-Lawrence river.

Riviere-Ouelle’s leader – the seigneur de La Bouteillerie – was expected to stay at Gov. Frontenac’s side to defend the walled fortress-city of Quebec and there was no militia present because they had all been sent either to Quebec City or to other crucial points along both shores of the St-Lawrence.

So Riviere-Ouelle’s other natural leader – Father de Francheville – took charge and exhorted the habitants of Riviere-Ouelle to do their part in the defense of La Nouvelle France by preventing any disembarkment by the British.

The habitants kept an eye out for the ships – and when they were spotted on the horizon Father de Francheville led a group of men down to a hidden place where the shore juts out and waited for the British to land. They were not disappointed. Once the tide rose, Admiral Phipps from Boston (U.S.A.) sent rowboats towards the beach at Riviere-Ouelle. The tide was so high that the boats landed very swiftly on the shore where they were met by a volley of musket balls. This must have been completely unexpected because they immediately retreated in great panic and never returned!

 


List of habitants presumed by Casgrain to have taken part  in this incident because they were of an age to carry arms


 

Francois and Joseph Deschamps

(sons of M. de la Bouteillerie who was in Quebec Cityat the time)

Francois Autin

Sebastien Boivin

Galleran Boucher (and his 3 sons)

Pierre Dancosse

Pierre Emond

Mathurin Dube

Nicolas Durand (and son)

Jean Gauvin (and son)

Pierre Hudon

Jean Lebel (and son)

Robert Levesque

Jean Mignot

Noel Pelletier

Pierre de St-Pierre

Jean de Lavoye

Guillaume Lissot (and son)

Charles and Jean Miville

Rene Ouellet (and 5 sons)

Jean Pelletier

Joseph Renault (and son)

 


Natives believed by Casgrain to have taken part  in this incident


Gabriel Keskabogouet

Guillaume Meokerimat

Pierre Oustabany

 


 

Source:  Casgrain, Abbe. H.R. (1890) Une paroisse Canadienne au XVIIe Siecle: La Riviere-Ouelle. Pub. C.O. Beauchemin & Fils

 

 

Related Posts

Index: Riviere-Ouelle, Quebec

Core Index: Acadian & French-Canadian Genealogy and History

 

 

 

February 22, 2009 - Posted by | . | , ,

45 Comments »

  1. Hi,
    I’m a descendant of Robert Levesque and i’m presently working on my family tree. I would like to know if it would be possible to make copies of some of the info and pictures that are part of my family tree.

    Also I would like to thank you for all the excellent work that you have done on your web page, it is a pleasure to look at and it is full of wonderful information.

    Thank you and have an excellent day.

    Note from Evelyn: I answered Sylvain via email.

    Like

    Comment by Sylvain Levesque | November 2, 2009 | Reply

  2. Hi, im also descendant of Robert Levesque and would like to know if you have any picture and info that would help me with my family tree, Thank you

    Like

    Comment by Andre Levesque | January 2, 2010 | Reply

  3. Hi, I’ve been trying to learn more about Pierre Hudon(dit Beaulieu) as he is the first Hudon to come to Canada. I thought you may want to know a little tid-bit about this battle. I’ve been told that Pierre was the only one with military experience so it is likely that he prepared everyone. If you know anything more about Pierre Hudon I sure would love to hear from you. Thanks. I would also like to copy your article.

    Like

    Comment by Shelly (Hudon)Gray | January 22, 2010 | Reply

    • Hello Shelly,

      I am a direct descendant from Pierre HUDON dit BEAULIEU. I have much information on our ancestor and his family. Unfortunately all is in French.

      But, if you are not in a hurry:
      a) I could translate some of the stuff and
      b) write some too.

      Gilbert Beaulieu
      in Farnham Quebec
      beaug6@gmail.com
      450-293-0247

      Like

      Comment by Gilbert Beaulieu | November 1, 2010 | Reply

  4. Wow, what a great job. I have been searching my family, Mignot, for about five years now. And love to read about the times of QC and their lives. I would like permission to print off what you have concerning Jean Mignot.
    Jean was in the military and was a tailor as well, like his father in France. I have read that he was involved in a few indian military operations. I have a land map with people that were neighbors and settlers with him and his wife, Louise Cloutier. Thank you for your hard work and dedication to genealogy research. Regards, Dave

    * * *

    Dave,
    Thanks for your kind comments and thanks for asking to use material. You are free to download and print anything off this site. Permission is required to reprint – and in particular if it is being used on the internet in any way.
    I will take a second look at the Rivere Ouelle parish history to see if there is anything else about your ancestor.
    Have a good day,Evelyn

    Like

    Comment by Dave Migneault/Mignot | February 23, 2010 | Reply

    • Hi Dave, my siblings and I were recently surprised to learn that our name “Labrie” was originally “Mignot-dit-Labrie” or “Mignault-dit-Labrie” We are direct descendants of Jean Mignot-dit-Labrie and the info on his marriages is first to a Boucher and later to a Dube. You mention a wife named Louise Cloutier. Did that marriage pre-date Jean’s wedding to Marie-Xainte Boucher in November of 1689? We only have a little information about our Great x8 grandfather and names only for the descendants up until our great grandfather. We are descended from Jean and Marie-Xiante’s son Michel. I wonder if you are of the same branch? Best regards, and thank you for any info you may be kind enough to provide. Sincerely, Annie

      Like

      Comment by amjpeace | January 5, 2015 | Reply

    • Hello, again, Dave. I found information that your ancestors, Jean Mignot and Louise Cloutier were married on Nov.10, 1648. The settler named Jean Mignot dit Labrie who was at the battle of Riviere-Ouelle was born later, in 1665 at Saint-Germain-Laxis, Ile-de-France, married to Marie Boucher in 1689. It is intriguing that they share the same name and I wonder whether they were related. Best regards, Anne Labrie Jasper

      Like

      Comment by amjpeace | May 25, 2019 | Reply

      • Wow….so many names from my ancestry tree! Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu and Mathurin Dubé for sure! I will have to look into Rivière Ouelle when I have more time! Thank you for posting this!

        Like

        Comment by Linda Beaulieu | May 25, 2019 | Reply

  5. I would like permission to copy some of your work. My grandmother was a Beaulieu (Hudon dit Beaulieu) direct descendant of Pierre Hudon. I am teaching my grandson the family history, and he is extremely proud of his heritage. I am trying to prepare some work for him to do and have been interested in the battles Pierre and his sons were involved in during their lifetime. Your website has caught my interest. Please let me know if I can be allowed to copy some of your work. You have done an excellent job. Thank you for preserving some of my family’s history.
    Sincerely
    Charlyene

    Like

    Comment by Charlyene Rataiczyk | April 23, 2010 | Reply

    • Charlyene Rataiczyk, I am Dave Migneault (Mignot).
      I have found the names of the son’s that accompanyied their fathers into this battle. I am willing to share with you and your son what I have found. email me at davemig2@windstream.net. I look forward to hearing from you.

      Like

      Comment by Dave Migneault | April 23, 2010 | Reply

  6. Thank you for this information! I am a descendant of Pierre Dancosse and enjoy any information regarding the history of the time and region the family endured in forging a new life in the Americas.

    Note from Evelyn: Answered by email

    Like

    Comment by Russell Doncouse | July 22, 2010 | Reply

  7. My father Richard Willette does geneology for our family. I found this website looking up Riviere Ouelle which he mentioned my ancestors, one being Rene Ouellet, started their life in North America. I would like permission to use your work and would also like to ask if you know the names of Rene Ouellet’s 5 sons that accompanied him in the Battle of Riviere Ouellet.

    If you are interested I can have my father send some information off to you about anything he has. Thank you for your time.

    Note from Evelyn: Answering privately.

    Like

    Comment by Jason Willette | August 9, 2010 | Reply

    • Jason Willette, I am Dave Migneault (Mignot) and I have researched the families that were in the Battle. My email address is davemig2@windstream.net and I would be happy to share my notes (excel) with you or anyone else that is interested. I look forward to hearing from you. Regards, Dave

      Like

      Comment by Dave Migneault | August 10, 2010 | Reply

      • That’s very generous of you, Dave – as always. I’ll pass your message on to Jason in case he misses it!
        Evelyn

        Like

        Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | August 10, 2010 | Reply

  8. Hi Evelyn! I want to thank you for maintaining this site. I also wanted to ask you if I could copy one or two of your pictures: my ancestors Miville-Deschenes and Cazes, come from both Rivere-Ouelle and Ste-Anne-de-la-Poatiere and I love collecting images of the places where these families thrived. I would used them simply as points of reference in my genealogy. Thank you for considering this request.
    Also, if you have any information or images of these two families or if you have access to resources or contacts, I would appreciate any help you can furnish. Merci beaucoup.
    Dan

    Note from Evelyn:
    Permission granted & contacting privately

    Like

    Comment by Dan Teitelbaum | September 16, 2010 | Reply

  9. Does anyone know if Robert Levesque was native american i. e. Micmac tribe? I’ve been trying to find out? I am 11th generation of Robert Levesque on my mom’s side and have always wondered if we had native american in our ancestry?

    Like

    Comment by Brian Bernier | October 31, 2010 | Reply

    • Hello Charlyene,

      I am a direct descendant from Pierre HUDON dit BEAULIEU. I have much information on our ancestor and his family. Unfortunately all is in French.

      But, if you are not in a hurry:
      a) I could translate some of the stuff and
      b) write some too.

      Gilbert Beaulieu
      in Farnham Quebec
      beaug6@gmail.com
      450-293-0247

      Like

      Comment by Gilbert Beaulieu | November 1, 2010 | Reply

    • Hello Brian,

      Robert LÉVÊQUE, a carpenter, was the son of Pierre m. Marie CAUMONT of Hauto-St-Sulpoice, Rouen diocese, Normandy.

      He arrived in New France in summer 1671, aboard the Saint-Jean-Baptiste (300 barrels).

      He married Jeanne CHEVALIER, dau. of Jacques & Marguerite SCORMAN, from St Jacques de Dieppe, Rouen diocese, Normandy, in Ange-Gardien on April 22, 1679.

      Gilbert Beaulieu
      Farnham Quiebec
      beaug6@gmail.com
      450-293-0247

      Like

      Comment by Gilbert Beaulieu | November 1, 2010 | Reply

  10. Hello distant cousin Shelly,

    I happen to be a direct descendant from Pierre HUDON dit BEAULIEU. I have much information on our ancestor and his family. Unfortunately all is in French.

    But, if you are not in a hurry:
    a) I could translate some of the stuff and
    b) write some too.

    Gilbert Beaulieu
    in Farnham Quebec
    beaug6@gmail.com
    450-293-0247

    Like

    Comment by Gilbert Beaulieu | November 1, 2010 | Reply

  11. Hi, I am looking for my great great grandfather’s family. I got his name in the Drummond, NB Church books. His name is Jean Hudon who was adopted by a Beaulieu Family. They lived in Riviere Ouelle, QC. I know he married Marie-Anne Lizotte in St-Basile, NB in 1865. Any information would be helpful.Thanks

    Like

    Comment by Tanya Dube | December 9, 2010 | Reply

  12. Hello,
    I just stumbled on your site while looking up info for my genealogy tree and after doing some “painstaking” and extensive research,and translating many old, hard to read, French documents, I discovered that I was direct blood related to 21 of the 40 men, and boys involved on that 1690 October day in Riviere Ouelle. I know this may sound strange, it surely blew me away when I discovered it, but it’s true, and what’s even more amazing, I can proove it. Here are the names of my ancestors that were involved on that historic day, Robert Levesque, Pierre Hudon, Galleran Boucher and his two sons, Pierre and Philippe, Michel Bouchard, and his three sons, Etienne, Francois and Pierre, Pierre Dancosse, Rene’ Ouellet, and his four sons, Abraham, Mathurin-Rene’, Gregoire and Joseph, Jean Pelletier, and his son, Jean-Baptiste, Jean Mignot-dit-Labrie, Noel Pelletier and Francois Autin… I would not be here as I am if the Battle had gone the other way. Ok, here is my question, without actually going to the actual site of where this battle occured, would anyone have any pictures, or have access to paintings of this site? I’m an artist and I want very much to do a painting of this battle scene… Sincerely, John R. Pelletier, Jonesport, Maine, USA

    Like

    Comment by John Pelletier | March 14, 2011 | Reply

  13. Hello John,

    I do not know of any other painting or illustration of the Battle of Rivière-Ouelle other than the one in H. R. Casgrain’s book. I went to Rivière-Ouelle and Ste-Anne-de-la-Pocatière quite a few times and never saw anything of the like nor heard anything about such a production.I searched the Quebec archives and did not get any result.

    I am positive that, with some research you could gather the proper information to create the scene.

    R.-O. is on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River. The river is wide so the north bank appears as a thin line low on the horizon.

    At the time of the event, most land concessions were along the St. Lawrence shore, east of the river, extending inland to the heart of the village. There was a road along the river and the houses, barns, etc. were visible from the ships. The shore being rocky, even at high tide, access was minimal. Some concessions were inland on the south of the R.-O. river

    The R.O. river, upon reaching the village, is quite wide and runs N.N.W. towards the St. L. River, thus forming a somewhat narrow point of land at the mouth of the river.

    R.-O was the first real village so far east on the St. L. River. No doubt that Phipps, following the English troops practice of the times, wanted to destroy it and the others further up on his way to Quebec.

    Thus his throwing anchor and sending a few dozen men in row boats to do the job. The surprise he got plus the fact it was early fall made him haul anchor and go direct to Quebec.

    Note, for the painting,
    1. Phipps was supposedly leading around 40 to 50 ships, but the difficulty of going up the river against the strong flow and the generally southwest to northeast wind, his line of ships must have been extending many miles.They had been at sea for a few weeks after leaving Port-Royal and he probably saw an opportunity to give a break to his troops as much as getting free fresh food from the taken cattle, poultry, etc.

    So a few ships in the background would set the scene. **These were not as big ships as the ones crossing the ocean. Some research on the internet, at the National Congress Library or the N.Y. Library could give you some designs of the ships of the era.

    2. The soldiers were militia men hired for the venture, not wearing the regular army garb but more or less their usual clothing. Same for the sailors. Again a research for the clothing and arms of the period would give you the details needed for the assaillants.

    3. Same for the clothing of the R.-O. inhabitants, though most of them would be partially hidden behind rocks or trees. By the way I am not that certain the priest Francheville was owning and holding a gun then as shown in the Casgrain illustration.

    4. The scene could show the sailors holding 2-3 rowboats steady with their rows planted in the water, other on their way in, some soldiers already on the shore with others straddling the boats sides or already in the water with the ones on the shore expressing their surprise or turning to scramble back into the boats and a few helping the wounded ones, with maybe a few guns dropped on the ground.

    Wouldn’t that make a beautiful painting? 😉 😉 😉

    I think I have illustrations of the inhabitants clothing of the era. I’ll look it up.

    Genealogy wise, I am a descendant of Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu from both his sons Nicolas (direct line) and Jean-Bernard. I have much info on the first Hudon generations and the origin in France.

    Let me know if there is anything I may help you with.

    Gilbert Beaulieu
    beaug6@gmail.com
    450-293-0247

    Like

    Comment by Gilbert Beaulieu | March 19, 2011 | Reply

    • Hello Gilbert Beaulieu, or better said, Allo cousin,
      Thank you so much for responding, but first allow me to make my apologies for the way my comment may of sounded. I wanted so much to delete a part of it because it looked like I was bragging about my blood connection to these brave men of Riviere Ouelle and I really did not want to sound that way at all and I’m still rather red faced about it, so I hope this response corrects my errors. At the time I had just recently found these names on my ancestry tree and I was rather excited and honored that I was even connected to so many of them that my pride may of gotten in the way. Please forgive me my ignorence. I’m usually more level headed than that, Oppps, my bad… Thank you for your insights on my up and coming painting of the battle of Riviere Ouelle, which I think is way over due. I’m surprised that no one has done a painting of this battle as yet. I will take everything you mentioned, and anything else that you care to share, into consideration and use it to make this painting as accurite as possible, in fact, I’ve been searching the internet for pictures of such props to make it look as real and as historically correct as possible and I found quite a few ideas and leads already. I know that the men and boys involved were farmers and that their clothing would of reflected that. As far as Father Francheville deplicted as carrying a rifle in the Casgrain drawing, I found out in some of my research about him that though he was a valid Roman Catholic Priest, a man of the cloth, he was also a man of the woods and he was an avid hunter himself as most probably all of the other men and boys that were there were. And knowing my (our) family in the way that I do, and coming from a very long line of hunters and men of the woods, we are still a family of deer hunters and men of the woods, even to this day, so it would of been a given that all of the men and boys present would of known how to handle hunting rifles, very well, and would of made every shot count as you would do, especially while hunting for white tail deer who can be a very challenging game to put on the table, so every shot would have to count and I’m not surprised that the British soldiers and Sailors were surprised when the guns, all of a sudden, erupted, and that’s probably the way it went down. The men waited to find their targets and then the order was given. I can almost see the scene in my minds eye with all of the gun powder smoke floating out of the woods, the fear and confusion and the wild eyed suprise in the British soldiers eyes… I also know that the battle took place at the point of land that shoots out into the St. Laurent, near the existing camp ground that exist there today, but if I could get some close up pictures of the lay of the land, the rock out cropings, sea weed, types of trees, birds, in the area, etc and how close the land on the other side of the St. Laurent looks like as like the way you so well discribed, that would be awesome!!! So, ya cousin, (I have a lot of Beaulieus in my family tree too), please advise me if you will and with your help and advise, I can make this a master piece and that, is my intent. I plan on donating the painting to an active Quebec historical society in the Riviere Ouelle, La Pocatiere, Kamouraska area when I’m finished, so I may seek some contact info from you for that since you live in Quebec. I currently live in the State of Maine, USA which is right next door so that shouldn’t be a problem, and I still can speak French so, ya, lets keep in touch… John Pelletier

      Like

      Comment by John Pelletier | March 20, 2011 | Reply

      • To John Pelletier, and also to my unknown Canadian relatives everywhere.
        My name is Peter Longley, and I live in Cumberland, Maine. I grew up in Lewiston, Maine, with Father from Lewiston, and my Mother being born in St Alexis de Matapedia, QC.
        On my Mothers side, her Father ( my Grandfather) was born in Lewiston before going to Canada to get married in St Alexis, but my Papeire’s family came down to Maine in the 1870’s from the Riviere Ouelle, La Pocatierre, and Rimouski part of Q.C.. His last name was Plourde. I can find history showing Francis Plourde family emigrating from Poitiers Poitou, France around 1700 to Riviere Ouelle.
        Many family names in Quebec related to Plourde family in Riviere Ouelle area are Greniellion, Berube, Levesque, Ouellette, Hudon, and Beaulieu. So lots of distant relatives from Canada.
        Just to give you an idea of my many Canadian relatives, my Grandmother on my mothers side from St Alexis, was one of about 10 children. Her name was Cedelice Dufour. All her siblings had many children, and she had 17 herself, 15 were born in USA after moving to Lewiston in 1923.
        How is your painting coming?
        Keep me posted at: Long2pete@aol.com

        Like

        Comment by Peter longley | May 23, 2012 | Reply

  14. Hello John,

    Contrary to you I am not surprised there is no painting or illustration of this event as it is practically unknown to the public, the Phipps venture being remembered in history teaching only by Frontenac’s answer to the emissary.

    I may already have some photos of the area but will have to check. In any event, i shall stop in Rivière-Ouelle on my next trip down the River sometimes in July probably.

    In the mean time, you could contact me at my email address below for future exchanges of info and material on this matter.

    By the way, we are close neighbors as I reside in Eastern Townships.

    Gilbert Beaulieu
    450-293-0247
    beaug6@gmail.com

    Like

    Comment by Gilbert Beaulieu | March 20, 2011 | Reply

  15. Hi everyone,
    I am direct descendant of René Plourde from Rivière Ouelle and am presently trying to finish the extensive line of this family. I just wanted to drop in to say hello to all my distant cousins and would be happy to help with any french translation. Je suis française. Best Regards
    Emilie

    Like

    Comment by Emilie Barriault | June 18, 2011 | Reply

  16. I am so proud of my reletive Pierre Hudon Dit Beaulieu 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Scott | July 10, 2012 | Reply

  17. Hi Family,
    I have been entering into My Heritage program my geneology from the Mathurin Dube and Marie Catherine Campion family and have discovered this wonderful website about Riviere Ouelle. I come from the 11th generation. My uncle, Dube side has been gathering our lineage for quite awhile and has traveled from the USA, France and into Canada (Île d’Orléans) for the past few years. Thank you all for the wonderful work you do in providing such rich history to our present generation. Sharon Beaulieu (Dube).

    Like

    Comment by Sharon Beaulieu (Dube) | August 5, 2012 | Reply

  18. Thank you for this insightfull website!

    Like

    Comment by Sharon Beaulieu (Dube) | August 5, 2012 | Reply

  19. Bonjours la grande famille, mois aussi est un descendant de Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu et aussi descendant de Augustin Hebert et son epouse Adrienne Duvivier. Moi aussi je m’appel Gilbert Beaulieu, nee a Sudbury, Ontario. J’habit presentement a Taber, en Alberta.

    Like

    Comment by Gilbert Beaulieu | August 11, 2012 | Reply

  20. Evelyn —

    André Mignier dit Lagacé and Jacquette Michel are my seventh-great-grandparents and I have been researching my French-Canadian roots for several years. Your blog is a great resource; thank you very much for all you’ve done to develop it. I believe the reason that André does NOT appear at the Battle of Rivière-Ouelle is that the family had not yet moved to the Grand Anse.

    The first evidence I have seen of André and family moving to La Pocatière, where they would spend the rest of their lives, is a three-year lease that he signed on 28 June 1692. Moreover, Abbé Casgrain’s 1890 history of the Rivière-Ouelle parish of the 17th century, “Une Paroisse Canadienne au XVII Siecle – La Rivière-Ouelle” has one table that shows the families who were in the Rivière-Ouelle Catholic Registers from 1681 to 1690. André is NOT listed in that table, but IS listed in a second table that shows families from 1690 – 1703. Together the tables, along with the lease, suggest that the family did not relocate to the Grand Anse region until after 1690. So, where were they? Would you believe Acadia?

    in 1686, the census taken in Beaubassin shows:
    “CHIGNOUCTOU DIT BEAUBASSIN
    Michel LENEUF Sr. de la Vallière, seigneur of Beaubassin 45; children: Alexandre 20, Jacques 17, Marie-Josephe 15, Jean-Baptiste 12, Juditte 10, Michel 8, Marguerite 6, Barbe 4; servants: Francois
LEGER 55, GABRIEL 20, Michel LARCHE 22, Marie LAGASSE 16; and Me. PERTUIS, gunsmith; 70 guns, 60 arpents, 19 cattle, 22 sheep, 12 hogs.” So we see André’s sixteen year-old daughter Marie is working in the household of Michel Leneuf de la Vallière, the seigneur of Beaubassin.

    Then, Genealogist Paul Delaney, from the Center for Acadian Studies at the University of Moncton in New Brunswick, found in a 1688 census of Sieur Richard Denys de Fronsac, the seigneur of Miramichi, a region in Acadia north of Beaubassin,

    “a man named Lagassé a native of St Martin de Ré, La Rochelle and his wife of La Rochelle”.

    Delaney concludes that André and Jacquette were indeed present on the Miramichi River in 1688 as one of five families living in the manor of Richard Denys. We do not know how long they stayed after 1688, but we do know that daughter Marie-Françoise married Robert Morin in Charlesbourg in 1690. Since she was only 16 years old at the time, we can guess that the Mignier/Lagacé family probably returned to Charlesbourg before 1690.

    But whenever it was that they did return, their oldest daughter Marie, who had worked for LaVallière, stayed in Acadia. In 1692, she married Joseph Gravois and gave birth to a son, Joseph. In less than a year, Gravois himself died and Marie, with her son, married René Martin de Barnabé and moved to Port Royal, Acadia. There, she and René would raise Joseph and would have 11 children of their own.

    I hope this is helpful.

    Like

    Comment by tedlegs | November 18, 2012 | Reply

    • That would explain why he was not on the list… If he had been in Rivière-Ouelle in 1690, he would have been with all the others.

      Like

      Comment by Pierre Lagacé | December 10, 2012 | Reply

  21. […] vous pensez que je suis un passionné, visitez le site d’Evelyn. Je le connais depuis 2008 quand j’ai commencé à bloguer. Je me demandais à cette époque […]

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    Pingback by À la recherche de nos héros de Rivière-Ouelle | Nos ancêtres | December 11, 2012 | Reply

  22. Has this book been translated into English? I would also like more information about my ancestor Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu. Photos of places around Rivière Ouelle that he may have lived. Stories of him and his descendants. Thank you! Merci beaucoup!

    Like

    Comment by Linda | August 10, 2016 | Reply

  23. I to am a descendant of Robert Levesque. I am also the direct descendant of Pierre de St. Pierre as well my 7th great grandfather was Pierre’s son Ignace who was 2 years old almost 3 years old when this battle took place. I am also a descendant of most of the heroes from that day. And I am surprised that they only give the month and year of this battle and refuses to put the actual day this battle took place so we don’t know what that exact day in that month the battle in Riviere-Ouelle took place. Which would give me a better idea of how long it took these 32 British ships made it to Quebec before the Battle of Quebec in October of 1690. Which we know that the Battle of Quebec began on October 16, 1690 and then lasted until October 24, 1690. My biggest question is. How long before October 16th were those ships at Riviere-Ouelle during that month? Which was when the Battle of Riviere-Ouelle took place which lead our ancestors to defend the city.

    Like

    Comment by Chad Michael Saint Pierre | January 9, 2017 | Reply

    • Hello,
      You raise some interesting questions about why this is not more detailed. The reason is that this loose translation is from a local parish history. Traditionally (not sure it’s true today) parish priests were asked to submit regular reports about their area (I think every decade but don’t quote me). So the history is very local and very personalized.
      You will need to find other sources for your information I’m afraid!
      Evelyn

      Like

      Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | February 2, 2017 | Reply

  24. Wow! John I would love to see your painting when it is completed! – Mandi j

    Like

    Comment by Mandi J | January 23, 2017 | Reply

  25. I am a descendant of Damien Berube – I know Damien ro have been a stone mason in the colonies at that time. Do you have any information re: Damien Berube? I am also have Dube lineage, my great grandmother was Elise Dube wife of Isidor Berube. Any information or resources for the same you might share would be appreciated.

    Like

    Comment by Jim Sutton | December 31, 2018 | Reply

    • Hello,
      For now, I have added more genealogical data about Damien Berube’s background here to the original Berube post here –

      https://wp.me/pp92w-lhx

      Regarding his life in Nouvelle France, I will be publishing a post with an artistic rendering of Damien Berube with his tools and some notes on his life but that will have to wait a few weeks as I have other pressing work!

      Best regards,
      Evelyn

      Like

      Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | January 7, 2019 | Reply

    • Hello,
      Concerning the Isidore Berube marriage to Elise(?), was this a Quebec marriage? Do you have estimated dates?
      Evelyn

      Like

      Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | January 7, 2019 | Reply

      • I have attached a snip copy of the marriage certificate – it was in New Hampshire. They both died and are interred there as well. Jim

        On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 7:04 PM A Canadian Family wrote:

        > Evelyn Yvonne Theriault commented: “Hello, Concerning the Isidore Berube > marriage to Elise(?), was this a Quebec marriage? Do you have estimated > dates? Evelyn” >

        Like

        Comment by Kung Fu Damsels USA | January 8, 2019 | Reply

  26. I am wondering where I may be able to see the painting done of the battle of Rivierre-Ouelle

    Like

    Comment by Don Beaulieu | February 18, 2019 | Reply

  27. I am a descendant of the Mivilles does any one have any info on them in connection with this battle? drop me a line at ladproject@mail.com my name is Dennis

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    Comment by Dennis A. Lefebvre | April 19, 2019 | Reply

  28. Hello / Bonjour,

    My name is David S. Pierce, I have only just stumbled across the account of this event and will try to determine if my Boivin ancestors are connected to it. Other names of interest to me are: Gauvin, Levesque, Mignot / Mignault, Pelletier, and Beaulieu and perhaps more. My point in writing is to invite discourse and compliment the research and sharing already that has already been done. I am a graduate of the Ontario College of Art, but I am not seeking to paint a recreation, even though I too can imagine the scene. I wonder if any of these ancestors also took part in the Deerfield, Massachusetts raid of 1704? I live in Ontario, Canada.

    Like

    Comment by David S. Pierce | May 24, 2019 | Reply

    • Hello David,
      I haven’t personally followed up into this incident, however the list I generally is drawn from Une Paroisse Canadienne:

      François Autin, Sébastien Boivin, François et Joseph Deschamps de la Bouteillerie (son of the seigneur), Pierre Hudon dit Beaulieu, Galleran Boucher. Michel Bouchard and sons Etienne, Francois and Pierre Bouchard, and sons Pierre Boucher and Philippe Boucher, Pierre Dancosse, Jean de Lavoye, Mathurin Dubé, Nicolas Durand and son of the same name, Pierre Emond, Jean Gauvin and his son of the same name, Jean Lebel and son Jean-Baptiste.Robert Lévesque, Guillaume Lissot and son Claude Lissot,Jean Mignot dit Labrie, Jean Miville dit DeschesnesJoseph Renault and his son also Joseph Renault, René Ouellet and five sons called Abraham, Mathurin, Grégoire, René et Joseph Ouellet, Jean Pelletier, Noel Pelletier, and Pierre de St Pierre.

      Evelyn

      P.S. I realize that there are people (my ancestor Lagace for instance) who “should” have been on the list 🙂

      Like

      Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | May 25, 2019 | Reply


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