A Canadian Family

First Nations, French Canadians & Acadians

Hopital Youville, Noranda, Abitibi-Temiscamingue, Quebec

Vintage postcard of Youville Hospital in Noranda and Rouyn.

Like most historic hospitals, Hopital Youville has modernized and expanded down through the years. The hospital was first founded in 1929  by the Soeurs Grises de-la-Croix (Nicole Pepin, 1987). This postcard shows a more modern (1940s?) incarnation of Noranda Hospital.   Richard Ouellet states that this building (and its massive central staircase) were then encased in another building when the hospital was further expanded. Here’s a short description from the 1950s –

“Noranda City–Where the city of Noranda now stands, overshadowed by the huge smelters and buildings of the mine, there was once only a wilderness–there were no roads, and no railways, only the streams and the portages for the general run of men. Today it is a modern city with wide streets and

comfortable homes. It has many excellent stores, banks and office buildings. and the fifty-room Noranda Hotel. It has the new Youville Hospital with 250 beds, several schools and a high school, a recreation centre with a large rink, and a modern theatre.”

Source:  Canadian Register – Noranda Mines, Limited, 1959

Abitibi-Temiscamingue - Rouyn Noranda - hospital - vintage postcard

If you have a connection to  – or memories of – this Hopital Youville

then I would love to hear from you in the comment boxes below.

~

New information from Alain Bernier –  thanks 🙂

Your photo of Youville Hospital was taken somewhere between 1930 and 1945.  It shows the original building erected in 1930 to replace the “Hôpital des Saints-Anges”.  In 1945, work started on the enlargement of the hospital to take it from 85 to 250 beds.  The construction was completed in 1948, giving the hospital a Y shape with the original building, seen on your photo, forming the North wing of the new building.  The main entrance was moved from the North wing to the Central wing, located at the center of the “Y” shape building.  The South wing being symetrical with the North wing, it is difficult to tell the oldest part of the hospital (seen on your photo) from the newer parts comprised of the elegant central wing with it’s grand entry and curved facade, the South wing and the Rear (West) wing.

This archive photo from the National Library of Quebec (http://collections.banq.qc.ca/bitstream/52327/1955312/1/3740039_1.jpg) shows the completed Youville Hospital.  The original building seen on your photo is clearly visible (the darker portion on the right side of the archive photo).  The South, Central and Rear (West) wings are also clearly visible.

This document, in French, gives further details on the hospital: http://www.ville.rouyn-noranda.qc.ca/fr/fiche_quartier/rouyn-noranda/ (click on “Cliquer ici pour la version complète de l’historique de Rouyn-Noranda”.

I spent a week in this hospital in 1970.  It didn’t have all the modern facilities now found in hospitals.  Rooms did not have private toilets.  There was a large restroom at the end of the corridor.  I was a kid and I remember being woken up in the middle of the night by a nurse coming to give me an enema to prepare me for tests later in the morning.  I had no idea of what would happen but I soon found out and spent the next hour running back and forth from my room to the restroom down the corridor, each time passing in front of the nurses’ station where the nurses were very amused by my urgent galoping!  Each time I went, I thought it was the last one, only to find out, once back to my room, that I had to run down to the restroom again!

~

New from Don Murray – thank you!

I was born in Youville Hospital on Sept. 26 1949. My parents were Marge and Ken Murray, a miner who once worked with Dave Keon Sr. I believe we lived at 295 Second Street and I remember my dad throwing a bucket of water out the door at 50 below and it froze into smoke. I was about 3 when we moved to Ontario (another mine) so I don’t remember much about the town. I went back with a friend a few years ago and was embarrassed at my poor Ontario-taught French. I had always thought it was a rough, tough, rugged, grimy mining town and I was really pleased to see how pretty it is. I would like to come back again some day.

Notes from John Lake – thanks!

I was born in this hospital May 1st 1946 9lbs 2 ozs.to Frank Lake and Cora Lake.The MD was Dr Pauli. Had my appendex removed in 1955 by Dr Lindsey and my tonsils removed in 1952 by Dr Lindsey. The hospital smelled of ether in 52 and 55 and I remember the lights were very dull in the hall ways.

My Dad was an accountant at Wabi Iron Works on Murdock Ave. Hard to believe 66 years have gone by so quickly. I now live in Okotoks Alberta. I was a baby boomer.

*

 

Related Posts

Index: Vintage Postcards of Abitibi-Temiscamingue

Index: Vintage Postcards of Quebec

Index: Vintage Postcards

 

External Links

Rouyn-Noranda Group | Facebook 

 

 

December 30, 2011 - Posted by | .

41 Comments »

  1. I was born in this hospital May 1st 1946 9lbs 2 ozs.to Frank Lake and Cora Lake.The MD was Dr Pauli. Had my appendex removed in 1955 by Dr Lindsey and my tonsils removed in 1952 by Dr Lindsey. The hospital smelled of ether in 52 and 55 and I remember the lights were very dull in the hall ways. My Dad was an accountant at Wabi Iron Works on Murdock Ave. Hard to believe 66 years have gone by so quickly. I now live in Okotoks Alberta. I was a baby boomer.

    Like

    Comment by John Lake | February 27, 2012 | Reply

    • Hi John,
      My husband is a relative of Ewart Lindsay. Some years ago, we were in Noranda to see if we could locate his grave. We ran out of time and never did find it. Do you know where he and his wife are buried or someone in the area who I could contact who might be able to help us? Ewart had 2 children James and Jane. Did they stay in the area?

      Replied privately

      Like

      Comment by Gerri | March 30, 2012 | Reply

      • Go to this web page, http://www.genealogie.org/club/genat/
        It’s in French, so once you get to the main site , look on the left and click on under Les Cimetieres then,then when that comes up, click on Abitibi Temiscaminque. You will see Noranda listed…click on that find the name and click on the number and viola a picture of the grave you want.

        Like

        Comment by James | August 15, 2012 | Reply

      • Hi – I am Jane Lindsay, daughter of Dr. Ewart Lindsay. My brother James (Jim) and I would like to contact this relative of Ewart (John Adyn Ewart) Lindsay. We have lived in the Toronto area since 1958.

        Like

        Comment by Jane Lindsay | December 15, 2016 | Reply

        • Hi Jane – sorry to be so long getting back to you. In all honesty, I was surprised to see a response. Was “Win” your mother’s given name. I have been researching a family which I believe to be hers. If I am correct, we live in the same city where her family settled. Did she pass away in Toronto and where is she buried? There are many J. Lindsay’s on Canada 411 in Toronto. I’m not sure how to get in touch with you, but it would be nice if we could.

          Like

          Comment by Gerri | March 25, 2017 | Reply

          • Gerri,
            Would you like me to forward your message to Jane Lindsay’s email address?
            Evelyn

            Like

            Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | March 25, 2017

          • My mother’s nickname was “Win” but her legal given names were Davina Clark (maiden last name left out for privacy). She passed away in Mississauga 1984 and is buried beside my Father in Noranda cemetery. As you can understand I do not know who you are and am uncomfortable leaving any more information on a public web site and do not know how to reply privately.

            Like

            Comment by Jane Lindsay | March 26, 2017

          • Jane,
            Do you grant me permission to give your email address to Gerri?
            Evelyn

            Like

            Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | March 26, 2017

          • yes – you may give my email address, privately, to “Gerri”.

            Like

            Comment by Jane Lindsay | March 26, 2017

    • My name is Rachel. I was born there on November 2947. Passed many days in hospital with nose bleeds. I am still looking for my real parents…my adoptive parents were Syvi and Lorraine Lacasse. Would like to have information concerning my biological parents. I now live in Saskatoon,Saskatchewan . Any information would be greatly appreciated

      Like

      Comment by Rachel McConnell | November 29, 2017 | Reply

    • Was it the only hospital in Noranda in 1953?

      Like

      Comment by vahe guzel | January 28, 2018 | Reply

      • Hello,
        I’m afraid I don’t have that information for you.
        Evelyn

        Like

        Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | January 28, 2018 | Reply

    • Doctor Lindsey saved my life many times. This is the first time I have ever been able to put a face to my memories and seeing it was a bit emotional. I would very much like to know where he was buried.

      Like

      Comment by Frank Senechal | September 22, 2020 | Reply

      • Dr. Ewart (John Ewart Adyn) Lindsay is buried in Noranda Cemetery.

        Like

        Comment by Jane Lindsay | September 22, 2020 | Reply

        • Thank you, Jane 🙂

          Like

          Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | September 22, 2020 | Reply

  2. Is there anyway I can find out who were patients there in April of 1947. I believe my father spent several months there after a mining accident that happened April 23, 1947 at shaft #4 of the Malartic Gold Mine. I have found some information on the mining accident but very little details.

    Like

    Comment by Noella Larente | March 19, 2012 | Reply

  3. For those researching the Rouyn-Noranda area –

    1. Leave your query here in the comment boxes because there is a lot of Noranda internet traffic on this post.
    2. If you don’t get a response, try leaving another query at the Rootsweb Abitibi Temiscamingue Message Board –
    http://boards.rootsweb.com/localities.northam.canada.quebec.abitibi/mb.ashx

    Good hunting!
    Evelyn

    Like

    Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | March 31, 2012 | Reply

  4. I was born in this hospital on may 28 1941 and the doctor was dr Pauli.and the doctor gave me for adoption the same day.anyone knows anything about this please reply

    Like

    Comment by Robert Leroux | April 22, 2012 | Reply

  5. Hello,

    Your photo of Youville Hospital was taken somewhere between 1930 and 1945. It shows the original building erected in 1930 to replace the “Hôpital des Saints-Anges”. In 1945, work started on the enlargement of the hospital to take it from 85 to 250 beds. The construction was completed in 1948, giving the hospital a Y shape with the original building, seen on your photo, forming the North wing of the new building. The main entrance was moved from the North wing to the Central wing, located at the center of the “Y” shape building. The South wing being symetrical with the North wing, it is difficult to tell the oldest part of the hospital (seen on your photo) from the newer parts comprised of the elegant central wing with it’s grand entry and curved facade, the South wing and the Rear (West) wing.

    This archive photo from the National Library of Quebec (http://collections.banq.qc.ca/bitstream/52327/1955312/1/3740039_1.jpg) shows the completed Youville Hospital. The original building seen on your photo is clearly visible (the darker portion on the right side of the archive photo). The South, Central and Rear (West) wings are also clearly visible.

    This document, in French, gives further details on the hospital: http://www.ville.rouyn-noranda.qc.ca/fr/fiche_quartier/rouyn-noranda/ (click on “Cliquer ici pour la version complète de l’historique de Rouyn-Noranda”.

    I spent a week in this hospital in 1970. It didn’t have all the modern facilities now found in hospitals. Rooms did not have private toilets. There was a large restroom at the end of the corridor. I was a kid and I remember being woken up in the middle of the night by a nurse coming to give me an enema to prepare me for tests later in the morning. I had no idea of what would happen but I soon found out and spent the next hour running back and forth from my room to the restroom down the corridor, each time passing in front of the nurses’ station where the nurses were very amused by my urgent galoping! Each time I went, I thought it was the last one, only to find out, once back to my room, that I had to run down to the restroom again!

    Like

    Comment by Alain Bernier | November 12, 2012 | Reply

  6. I was born in Youville Hospital on Sept. 26 1949. My parents were Marge and Ken Murray, a miner who once worked with Dave Keon Sr. I believe we lived at 295 Second Street and I remember my dad throwing a bucket of water out the door at 50 below and it froze into smoke. I was about 3 when we moved to Ontario (another mine) so I don’t remember much about the town. I went back with a friend a few years ago and was embarrassed at my poor Ontario-taught French. I had always thought it was a rough, tough, rugged, grimy mining town and I was really pleased to see how pretty it is. I would like to come back again some day. Don Murray

    Like

    Comment by Don Murray | January 30, 2014 | Reply

  7. Je suis née à cet hôpital en novembre 1952, le prénom biologique de ma mère est Yvette, je suis à la recherche de mes origines et les archives se terminent en 2008… Comment faire mes recherches SVP? Je voudrais faire mon arbre généalogique et je n’ ai aucun repère. Merci à l’avance, voici mon email: diane_l_18@hotmail.com la lettre entre_ est un L minuscule. Merci.Diane.

    Like

    Comment by Diane Lalonde | October 24, 2014 | Reply

    • Diane, my grandmother’s maiden name was lalonde, her ancestor was Jean de lalonde who came to Baie D’urfe in the 1600’s and was killed by the Iroquois. I have heard rumor that the lalonde name has Iroquois heritage..is this true? Thank you Marlene, my French is not good as my mother lost her French when they moved to an English area.

      Like

      Comment by Marlene Mulvaney | November 30, 2014 | Reply

      • Yes, i heard the samething too about the Iroquois legacy. My adopted dad has iroquois’s blood I think. He looket like anayway. Stong bones, strong caracter and a fighter… Thank you for writing me… Diane.

        Like

        Comment by Diane Lalonde | December 1, 2014 | Reply

      • Diane, My 8th Great Grandfather was Jean de Lalonde, 1640-1687, He was killed by Iroquois at the Lachine Massacre. I have a lot of info from my Ancestry research that I am willing to copy and send to you. I do not read Iroquois heritage.
        Elaine (Latulipe) Erlandson

        Like

        Comment by Elaine Erlandson | August 3, 2020 | Reply

  8. Born February 28, 1966 named Christian Belanger and placed for adoption through the Sister Mary Eugene Foundation and Gaspe Social Services! I spent 4 months at Crèche d’Youville before going to a foster home for 14 months and then went to live with my adoptive family in New Jersey! My birth mother was from Aventure, Gaspe, Quebec! She is still in the Gaspe area! Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Like

    Comment by Christian Belanger | November 8, 2014 | Reply

  9. I was born in Noranda,at the Youville Hospital,on the 8 of November 1947.
    The priest put me for adoption the next day.
    Would anyone know who my mother was? Have searching for many years..but nothing.
    My maiden name was Rachel Lacasse,lived on Avenue C in Noranda.
    I know live in Saskatoon,Saskatchewan.
    My married name is McConnell

    Like

    Comment by Rachel McConnell | August 12, 2015 | Reply

    • I was born in the hospital in the Noranda-Rouyn area in December 1939. I would presume by what I have read here, that it may have been the Youville Hospital. My mother has told me that she and I were looked after by the sisters who spoke mostly French which she was not able to understand most of the time. My parents were from Nova Scotia. My dad and his cousin had jobs in the Noranda mines complex. I remember being told that one of the jobs involved in the construction of an industrial fence around the mining complex.

      They lived in what appears to have been a type of temporary housing, like a camp covered in tarpaper. ….a sort of a duplex arrangement for the two couples: dad and mum and infant me in the bedroom at one end, dad’s cousin , wife and infant son in the bedroom at the opposite end. There was a common living space in the central area of the cabin. I would like to know more about where in the Noranda-Rouyn area, this housing existed and the industrial fence., etc. In the summer of 1940 due to the beginning of W.W.II, we were called home to the family farm in Nova Scotia where dad took over the operation of the family farm. His mother was a widow and his younger brothers had joined up in the armed services for duty overseas. I grew up in Nova Scotia and have not yet had the opportunity to see the place where I was born. Thankfully the nature of the internet has helped me gain some perspective on the place of my birth.

      Like

      Comment by Sherman Williams | October 29, 2016 | Reply

  10. […] brother and I were both born In Noranda on the west shore of Lake Osisko at what was  then Hopital Youville. Just two short portages away is the Kinojevis River; a tributary of the Ottawa which flows south […]

    Like

    Pingback by Canoeing Quebec’s Coulonge River System – Introduction, Planning, Maps | ramblin' boy | October 20, 2016 | Reply

  11. I was born in the hospital in the Noranda-Rouyn area in December 1939. I would presume by what I have read here, that it may have been the Youville Hospital. My mother has told me that she and I were looked after by the sisters who spoke mostly French which she was not able to understand most of the time. My parents were from Nova Scotia. My dad and his cousin had jobs in the Noranda mines complex. I remember being told that one of the jobs involved in the construction of an industrial fence around the mining complex.

    They lived in what appears to have been a type of temporary housing, like a camp covered in tarpaper. ….a sort of a duplex arrangement for the two couples: dad and mum and infant me in the bedroom at one end, dad’s cousin , wife and infant son in the bedroom at the opposite end. There was a common living space in the central area of the cabin. I would like to know more about where in the Noranda-Rouyn area, this housing existed and the industrial fence., etc. In the summer of 1940 due to the beginning of W.W.II, we were called home to the family farm in Nova Scotia where dad took over the operation of the family farm. His mother was a widow and his younger brothers had joined up in the armed services for duty overseas. I grew up in Nova Scotia and have not yet had the opportunity to see the place where I was born. Thankfully the nature of the internet has helped me gain some perspective on the place of my birth.

    Like

    Comment by Sherman Williams | October 29, 2016 | Reply

  12. there a good change my dad was born in this place but he was apotie out, July 19 1944, his last name was Toutant
    thanks for helping

    Like

    Comment by Natalie Smusiak | November 6, 2017 | Reply

  13. My dad Claude Vallieres a miner died there on Sunday November 6th 1955. I remeber visiting my step-mother there when I was a kid in the 1950’s….

    Like

    Comment by Jean-Paul Vallieres | November 28, 2017 | Reply

  14. I am looking for half sibling possibly born first week of September 1953 at Youville Hospital. Birth mother Yvonne. Possible private adoption. Any help finding would be great.

    Like

    Comment by Marlene | May 13, 2018 | Reply

  15. My name is Jacques Archambault jr. .My father was an optometrist on rue Gamble in front of A&P. We lived on 151 1’ave(now Frederic Hubert) while at college universitaire de rouyn,I had the honors to be a laboratory tech.at old Youville Hospital In my last 2 years.To qualified we had to write an essay why we want to become a doctor. I did and at 18 years old , was accepted at U of Montreal and became an orthopedic surgeon.I did not want to practice solo in Noranda and had offer in Texas. Also in my last 2 years of residency as orthopedic,I did some weekend moonlighting in new Hospital ER.

    Like

    Comment by Jacques Archambault | July 9, 2019 | Reply

    • Bonjour, Jacques, I just read your above note as I search for stories from Noranda, a city where I grew up and left in 1962 to study Nursing in Montreal. I lived on 15th St, next to Murdoch, and went to Sacred Heart School in Noranda and St Joseph HS in Rouyn. I remember your father! I am an avid searcher on ANCESTRY for hints about my heritage. JACQUES ARCHAMBEAULT, 1604-1688 was my 9th maternal great grandfather. He was born in France and died in Montreal. Search his name on the internet. He was extremely productive and prosperous. He dug the first well in Montreal. There is also an Orthopedic Surgeon in Saint Albans, VT. Dr Jacques Archambault. Where are you now? I had a delightful career in New York City as Neurosurgery ICU nurse at Bellevue, then Head Nurse work in Head and Neck Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital. The last 16 years I was an Operating Room Nurse. At Memorial,where I met my husband, Dr Robert A Erlandson, a Pathologist, and we have been married for 48yrs. No kids, just a cat “JOSEPHINE”. We currently live in a house at the New Jersey Shore, near Tuckerton, not far from Atlantic City. We also had a home in Vermont for 12 years. I understand French well, but to speak it, is atrocious. Just no place to find Quebec friends here.

      I keep in touch with only one friend from Noranda. She goes to reunions, and gives me highlights of the place.. Jim Keon was a neighbor and so was “Pit” Martin. Where are you now? Busy working? You mentioned the College in Rouyn. My brother , Dennis Latulipe went there in the 1960″s, but I do not remember when. He was born in 1952.

      My name is Elaine Erlandson nee LATULIPE. I hope you will find time to send me a “HELLO” note

      Regards,

      Elaine

      Like

      Comment by Elaine Erlandson | July 31, 2020 | Reply

      • Hi , I went to college de rouyn from 1959 to 1967 then med school u of montreal. I married the head nurse of neurosurgery at hotel -Dieu (47 year ago) .I moved to great state of TX ,semi retired and practice in Vt ,completely retired,became PSIA ski instructor in Vail/BeaverCreek .I now lived in mountain of NC. I be happy to chat with you in near future .ph # 970-471-2939 ,regards Jacques

        Like

        Comment by Jacques Miller Archambault jr. | November 3, 2020 | Reply

      • Hi again , I found recently a class picture element C of college universitaire of rouyn ‘59/‘60. In the upper right corner was in fact a D. Latulipe. That is equivalent of first year of high school and the C was the third class , and we needed to be fluent in English.

        Like

        Comment by Jacques | November 21, 2020 | Reply

      • Hi again , I found recently a class picture element C of college universitaire of rouyn ‘59/‘60. In the upper right corner was in fact a D. Latulipe. That is equivalent of first year of high school and the C was the third class , and we needed to be fluent in English.

        Like

        Comment by Jacques archambault | November 21, 2020 | Reply

        • Merry Christmas to you, Jacques, and your Family. Sure would be pretty this time of year in VT. Noranda too!
          Great talking to you recently.
          Elaine

          Like

          Comment by Elaine F Erlandson | December 4, 2021 | Reply

  16. I was born 1945 and raised in Noranda then joined the RCAF in London Ontario, my name is Benoit Bissonnette, I now lived in
    New Brunswick since 1981 and I am looking for MURIELLE McNeil ( her Father was a Dentist in Rouyn-Noranda.

    Like

    Comment by Benoit Bissonnette | December 15, 2019 | Reply

  17. I was born in Noranda Youville Hospital on xxxx xx, 1947. My mothers name was Dorothy Edith Darby(nee Stewart) and my father was Edward Stanley Darby. Father was an Engineer with the Noranda Mines. My name is Barbara Rowen (nee Ashton, Darby) and I grew up in Shawinigan until 1955 and father was transfered to Toronto. We moved away from Noranda, I believe in, 1949. I don’t have much information as parents were divorced in 1949 and don’t have anyone left to get further information. I have always wanted to go up just to look around and think one day I will. Soon I hope

    Like

    Comment by Barbara Ashton | August 11, 2020 | Reply

  18. In February of 1946 my mother and her sister were in the hospital awaiting the birth of their first children . I was born on the 19th and my cousin Robert was born two days later. Six months later my parents moved to Windsor Ontario were I live today. I have made many trips to Rouyn Noranda over the years to visit relatives. My cousin and I have remained friends all these years. I like to tell people that I was born on the shores of Lac Osisko . My children love to visit their dads hometown. Sadly growing up in Windsor I did not learn much French, which I regret. My wife and I sent our children to French Immersion and they are fluent in it. I have many stories of childhood visits to Rouyn and the adventures of my cousin Robert and I.

    Like

    Comment by Ernest Gaspar | August 28, 2020 | Reply


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