A Canadian Family

Natives, French Canadians, Acadians

Pointe-St-Charles (Mtl) Alexandra Hospital

History of Montreal Quebec Hospitals | Tuberculosis & infections diseases - sanatorium | Queen AlexandraI presume this hospital was named – like several others of the time –  after Canada’s Queen Alexandra. She was the Danish princess who married Queen Victoria’s son Edward and eventually became his Queen Consort. The Alexandra specialized in infectious diseases – especially tuberculosis . On a personal note, tuberculosis and polio were always my mother’s greatest fears and I remember that when I was a little girl (in the mid-50s) she would never let me go to the public pools for a swim. that was quite a burden in Montreal’s hot, steamy summers!

Interesting comment from below

“. . .  I am writing a paper on the Alexandra Hospital and can fill in a few blanks for you. When the hospital first opened it was dedicated to children (although it also treated adults) mainly measles, scarlet fever and diphtheria (croup). But it would also take various other diseases, including polio and chickenpox. They only opened a tuberculosis unit in 1948 but it closed in the 1960s (which is also when the hospital stopped taking contagious disease cases).
Finally, the “Alexandra Hospital today” is social housing not condos! The only buildings recycled from the original hospital buildings were the nurses residences and administration building.
Anyway that is just a brief note but if you want any more info let me know!  Comment by Kiley | December 9, 2015 | Edit | Reply”


Other Historic Quebec Hospitals

Hospital – Royal Victoria Hospital

Hopital Youville, Noranda Quebec

Hotel Dieu Hospital – Montreal (1925)

Caughnawaga’s Historical Hospital – Mid-Twentieth Century

Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue Veterans’ Hospital

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More information about Alexandra Hospital

 Alexandra Hospital Today (Condos at 240 Charon St.)

Alexandra Hospital  (1920)  Notman Archives

January 1, 2012 - Posted by | . |

14 Comments »

  1. Hi. I am writing a paper on the Alexandra Hospital and can fill in a few blanks for you. When the hospital first opened it was dedicated to children (although it also treated adults) mainly measles, scarlet fever and diphtheria (croup). But it would also take various other diseases, including polio and chickenpox. They only opened a tuberculosis unit in 1948 but it closed in the 1960s (which is also when the hospital stopped taking contagious disease cases).
    Finally, the “Alexandra Hospital today” is social housing not condos! The only buildings recycled from the original hospital buildings were the nurses residences and administration building.
    Anyway that is just a brief note but if you want any more info let me know!

    Like

    Comment by Kiley | December 9, 2015 | Reply

    • Hi, I am a member of la Société d’histoire de Pointe-Saint-Charles. We have very little infos about Alexandra Hospital. Can we see your paper ? It may be a good idea to insert it in our next Bulletin. Many thanks in advance,

      Like

      Comment by Nathacha | February 17, 2016 | Reply

      • Hi Nathacha! I am sorry I missed your note from so long ago now! I would be happy to send you the current draft of the paper but there are a few changes I hope to make before sharing it with the grand public. 🙂

        Like

        Comment by Kiley | October 11, 2016 | Reply

        • Hi Kiley,
          Learning history is a slow process requiring a lot of patience… so, I am used to wait! I’ll send you the same message on your Email…in case…

          Like

          Comment by Nathacha Alexandroff | October 11, 2016 | Reply

    • Hi Kiley – I am trying to find out more information about the Alexandra Hospital in the Pointe. On August 16, 1966 our 5 week old daughter had to be hospitalized there for whooping cough. They took very good care of her, and she was able to come home on October 8, 1966 But I’d like to know more about it. My only memory of it was that I was allowed to visit her once a week for an hour, but when I got there the first week, a nurse was holding her behind a rope barrier and I was not allowed to touch her. Not an easy situation. I’d love to hear back from you. Thank you.

      Nancy Stewart

      Like

      Comment by Nancy Stewart | October 10, 2016 | Reply

      • Hi Nancy! wow this is a very interesting story! This would have been one of the last years that the hospital was treating contagious diseases (they stopped taking contagious disease cases in 1968). If you are in Montreal, McGill University has the annual reports, which are actually quite descriptive and you might find them interesting. There is also a picture of children the whooping cough ward from 1937 at the BANQ website http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_chercheurs/description_fonds?p_anqsid=201511061133241211&p_centre=06M&p_classe=P&p_fonds=48&p_numunide=804237 (click “voir images:1”). Feel free to send me an email if you would like to correspond more about the hospital, I can also send you a draft of my paper: kileygoyette@gmail.com

        Like

        Comment by Kiley | October 11, 2016 | Reply

        • Hello Kiley!
          I’m not very active on the site right now due to other life commitments, however thanks for interacting with people who leave comments. If you want to write an actual post in order to collect more information or share more information, please feel free!
          Either way, thanks again.
          Evelyn

          Like

          Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | October 11, 2016 | Reply

    • Thanks for the information about the Alexandra hospital in the Pointe. I was a patient there in 1953. I was 5 years old and had rheumatic fever. I don’t remember much about my stay there. I do remember that I couldn’t bring any of my stuffed animals ( gifts) home as they were to be burned.

      Like

      Comment by Heather Hebert | September 22, 2017 | Reply

  2. Now it is a low-income subsidized housing.

    Like

    Comment by Janson | April 15, 2016 | Reply

  3. I was a student nurse at “The Alex” for 6 weeks during the summer of 1963. I well remember the children with whooping cough and I know we had at least one infant who was only five weeks old! I also took care of several children suffering from severe impetigo. First thing in the morning a nurse would have to scrub the lesions to remove scabs before applying an ointment. It was heart rending to have to make a child go through the process.

    This comment is now a post – “The Alex” by Catherine Cormier [ http://wp.me/pp92w-iVj ]

    Like

    Comment by Catherine Cormier | May 31, 2017 | Reply

    • Thank you for this great information Catherine Cormier!
      I have turned it into a post of its own
      Evelyn

      Like

      Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | May 31, 2017 | Reply

    • This is amazing Catherine! I would love to add your story to my paper!

      Your description of the dining room with Mrs McLeod is very similar to the memories of Katherine Snow, a student at the Alex in the 1938! She wrote a letter to the Gazette in 1992. I can send it to you by email if you are interested.

      Like

      Comment by Kiley | May 31, 2017 | Reply

      • Kiley, hello!
        I hadn’t looked at this post in awhile and had forgotten that you were researching the Alexandra.
        I could reprint your original comment as a stand-alone post so that it might draw more attention. If you’re interested I can use what you said above unless you would like to add a little bit more. Then if people contact me I would forward them your email address.
        Evelyn

        Like

        Comment by Evelyn Yvonne Theriault | May 31, 2017 | Reply

        • Hi Evelyn,
          It has been great that so many people visiting your site have shared their experiences at the hospital!! I love it!!
          Thank you for putting my comment in the post. I would love to send something more detailed, but I really don’t have time right now. I do have a short write-up that I made for a poster project; I can send you the text and images if you want. Please email me at: kileygoyette@gmail.com

          Like

          Comment by Kiley | June 1, 2017 | Reply


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