A Canadian Family

First Nations, French Canadians & Acadians

Whycocomagh | Mi’kmaq (1911)

Index: Native Surname Census Extracts

Index: The Mi’kmaq in Canadian Census Records

 

This is part of a larger project to locate surnames carried by Natives, First Peoples and Metis in Eastern Canada. In this series of posts, I list surnames carried by Aboriginal (or part Aboriginal) individuals in the 1901 and 1911 census for the eastern provinces of Canada. Note: There are regular updates including external links (e.g. maps, encyclopedia) and added information (e.g. specific tribal affiliations). The companion series – Native/First Peoples/Metis Surnames of Eastern Canada – Marriage Records  – contains many of the same surnames as well as others.

HOW TO USE  

1. To reach the original census records for the district named below, you can click on the External Links at the bottom of the post.

2. You can also click on each individual surname to reach its listing in one of the census records (usually 1901 or 1911).

3. Surnames highlighted in orange also appear in the Marriage Records (although often spelled differently). 

 


Census Data:

Enumeration District 40: Whycocomagh Indian Reserve, Inverness, N. S. (1911) Continue reading

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Tuscarora 35 | Six Nations, Iroquois (1911)

Index: Native Surname Census Extracts

 

This is part of a larger project to locate surnames carried by Natives, First Peoples and Metis in Eastern Canada. In this series of posts, I list surnames carried by Aboriginal (or part Aboriginal) individuals in the 1901 and 1911 census for the eastern provinces of Canada. Note: There are regular updates including external links (e.g. maps, encyclopedia) and added information (e.g. specific tribal affiliations). The companion series – Native/First Peoples/Metis Surnames of Eastern Canada – Marriage Records contains many of the same surnames as well as others.

Continue reading

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The Caughnawaga School (1883) | Surnames: Fletcher

Index: Newspaper Clippings & Other Extracts Related To Kahnawà:ke

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Note: The text below is included to portray a part of Caughnawaga’s local history, however it is also an unfortunate example of racist/colonial reporting. 

The annual examinations of the pupils of the Indian school at Caughnawaga was brought to a successful termination on Saturday. The pupils were in a splendid condition, both in cleanliness and proficiency and reflect great credit on those who conduct the school.  Our readers are aware of the difficulties that teachers have in general to surmount in these nurseries of civilization, more especially in one of this kind, where the attendance is continually broken, one would suppose that it would be almost impossible to make any headway with the pupils.

Remarkable as the fact may appear the last examination showed fully that notwithstanding the difficulties that from time to time present themselves in the work of pushing education as ordinary business would be pushed, the youthful Iroquois ahve been advanced to a successful position in their studies. They have been engaged in a glorious battle, that of conquering ignorance and in so doing they have truly shown their ambition to become the imitators of the valiant Christians, whose worth the Scriptures tell us is from afar.

The progress made by the Indians in general is ample proof of the assiduity of Mr. Fletcher in his charger over the school. The schoolmaster has always taken great interst in our Iroquois friends, and any effectual effort calculated to promote education, has always obtained his heartiest sympathy. He says that the present school is in need of sanitary improvements and hopes that the honorable minister charged with the administration of the Indian Department will erect a more suitable building, will all necessary appliances for a school.

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The Conversion of the Oka Indians (1877) | Kanenrakenhiate, Morrison, Mercier, Dougall, de Laronde, Matthewson, Rivet

Index: Newspaper Clippings & Other Extracts Related To Kahnawà:ke

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Chief Louis’ Narrative of the way the Indians turned Protestant – No white Protestants had any part in their conversion. Continue reading

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The Epidemic (1885) | Surnames: Pare

Index: Newspaper Clippings & Other Extracts Related To Kahnawà:ke

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THE EPIDEMIC

The Central Board – Caughnawaga in Danger

The Central Board of Health met yesterday afternoon. Dr. Marsden, in the absence of the President, Dr. Hingston, was chosen chairman.

Dr. Pare, of Lachine, reported several cases of smallpox at Caughnawaga and showed that urgent necessity for vigorous vaccination existed. Indians should not be let come into town with out certificates of vaccination.

It was decided to report the matter to Government and ask that a medical man be appointed to undertake the necessary sanitary and other work at Caughnawaga.

The secretary will visit Ottawa to bring the matter at once before the Government.

Medical Inspectors on trains were ordered to begin work at once, exacting certificates of vaccination form all incoming and outgoing passengers.

The isolation of patients in their own houses, wherever practicable, was decided on.

 

 

Source: Montreal Daily Witness – Dec. 12, 1885

 

Related Posts

Indexes: First Peoples

Index: Newspaper Clippings Related To Kahnawà:ke  

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Fire At Caughnawaga (1889) | Surnames: Jocks, Murray, Lalonde

Index: Newspaper Clippings & Other Extracts Related To Kahnawà:ke

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FIRE AT CAUGHNAWAGA

The stone houses of Chief Jocks (now Mayor) and James Murray, and the wooden house of John Price, with thier contents and the stables, were destroyed by fire last evening at Caughnawaga. By bringing pails up from the river the Indians – men, women and children – kept the neighboring houses wet enough to prevent the fire from spreading further, though the breeze was pretty strong. About $?,000 damage was done. Miss Lalonde had her shoulder broekn by a box thrown out of her father’s upper window.

Continue reading

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