A Canadian Family

First Nations, French Canadians & Acadians

French Canadian Pioneers: The Chartiers of Quebec

Index: Early French Canadian Pioneers of Quebec

Index: Filles du Roi

 

 

Jean-Joseph Chartier / aka John Carter  | Marie Courtemanche

October 29th, 1718 Riviere-des-Prairies

[Occ. Captive from Deerfield (Franklin, Mass, USA)

Louis-Theandre Chartier de Lotbiniere | Elisabeth D’Amours

August 2nd, 1641 Paris (France)

[Occ. Seigneurial attorney (Prosecutor?)]

Mathurin Chartier / Lamarche  | Marguerite Benard

March 23rd, 1699 Montreal (Notre-Dame)

[Occ. mil. de la Marine, Dumesnil]

Michel Chartier  | Marie Bellefond

November 9th, 1755 Quebec (Notre-Dame)

[Occ. baker]

Rene-Louis Chartier de Lotbiniere | Marie-Madeleine Lambert

June 3rd, 1709 Quebec (Notre-Dame)

[Occ. -]

Pierre Chartier / Cartier  | Catherine Gauthier

October 25th, 1675  Sillery

[Occ. -]

Pierre Chartier / Lavictoire |  Genevieve Vivien

October 10th, 1757 Montreal (Notre-Dame)

[Occ. mil. de la Marine, de Vergor

Rene Chartier  | Madeleine Ranger

August 7th, 1645 Poitiers (France)

[Occ. miller]

 

Pierre Rousset  |  Jeanne Chartier

November 3rd, 1669 St. Famille (Ile-d’Orleans)

Jeanne Chartier was a Fille du Roi.

 

Variations or associated surnames

Benac  –  Bernard
DeLotbinière  –  Durand  –  Durant
Laforest  –  Lamarche  –  Lavictoire
Lotbinière  –  Parthenais  –  Parthenay
Pellawel  –  Pieddeloup  –  Robert

 


This series of Early French Canadian Pioneers microposts is dedicated to the earliest settlers of Quebec. If you are new to the genealogy of French-speaking Canadians, please be aware that the earliest French settlers can also descend from the Acadian pioneers who originally settled in what are now Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. In addition, please note that any Native related links refer back to other posts citing census, marriage or other documents with indigenous or Metis individuals of that surname, however those individuals do not necessarily descend from those particular French Canadian settlers. The posts are intended as Finding Aides – a place to find possible clues and start your own research!

 


Filles du Roi   is the name that’s been given to about 700/800 women who emigrated from France to Quebec in the middle of the 17th century. They were called the King’s Daughters because Louis XIV (King of France) had sponsored their trips to the New World. Each Fille received her passage, a hope chest and room and board until her marriage (read further at The Canadian Encyclopedia).

Jeanne Chartier was a Fille du Roi. The first mention of her in New France is in 1669 (the year of her marriage)Jeanne’s parents were Louis Chartier and Mathurine Cacou of Nemours (St-Jean-Baptiste) (Seine-et-Marne), France. She had four siblings: Marie, Pierre and Sebastienne.

 

Filles du Roy

 

Related Posts

Index: Filles du Roi 

Index: Early French Canadian Pioneers

Theandre Chartier, Gentleman | A Portrait Gallery

A – B – C | Non-Natives Among First Nations People Of Canada

Core Index: Acadian & French-Canadian Genealogy & History

 

First Nations Marriage Records – Chartier Surname

CARI – CLIF | Native – First Peoples – Metis [CDN Marriage Extracts]

 

First Nations Census Records – Chartier Surname

Grand Rapids | Mixed, First Nations (1911)

 

External Links – Military

Troupes de la Marine | The Canadian Encyclopedia

Siege of Quebec | Colonial Troops | Troupes de la Marine

 

External Links – Other

Seigneurs | Virtual Museum of New France 

Seigneurial System | The Canadian Encyclopedia

Maison Gabriel | Give us this day our daily bread

Flour Milling | The Canadian Encyclopedia

 

 

 

 

 

March 12, 2019 - Posted by | . | , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s